Bryan Boyett; Author & Inspirational Speaker

Click here to edit subtitle

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                                      NOW AVAILABLE!



                                      Bryan's latest book,
        UNSUNG HEROES II: Voices of World War Two                           is available on Amazon.com


Members of the World War Two generation are a rare breed. Raised during the uncertainty of The Great Depression, these men of character would rise above the economic struggles of that time and go on to serve their country gallantly during a time of global war, and do so without hesitation. There is no doubt that their combined efforts saved the world from tyranny and oppression. Building on the success of the first volume, these are more of their stories.


Based on personal interviews, noted military biographer Bryan Boyett brings to life tales of honor, valor and courage. From storming the beaches of tiny islands, battling through dense forests, flying into war-torn skies, or sailing on the vastness of the Pacific Ocean, come experience the everyday antics of young men as they go about the business of war, including moments of sheer terror in the heat of combat.


Continuing in the tradition of the first volume, Unsung Heroes II is a truly a labor of love, with its purpose to honor the veterans of World War Two, teach others of their heroism, and preserve their stories for the generations to come.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


 Bryan's book,
UNSUNG HEROES: Voices of World War Two

 is available on Amazon.com


Members of the World War Two generation are a rare breed. Raised during the uncertainty of The Great Depression, these men of character would rise above the economic struggles of that time and go on to serve their country gallantly during a time of global war, and do so without hesitation. There is no doubt that their combined efforts saved the world from tyranny and oppression. These are their stories.

 

Based on personal interviews, noted military biographer Bryan Boyett brings to life tales of honor, valor and courage. From storming the beaches of tiny islands, battling through dense forests, flying into war-torn skies, or sailing on the vastness of the Pacific Ocean, come experience the everyday antics of young men as they go about the business of war, including moments of sheer terror in the heat of combat. 

 

Unsung Heroes is a truly a labor of love, with its purpose to honor the veterans of World War Two, teach others of their heroism, and preserve their stories for the generations to come.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Unsung Heroes honored

Posted: Nov 22, 2015 11:52 PM EST

MINT HILL, NC (WBTV)

It was a gathering of heroes Sunday at the VFW Hall in Mint Hill. A group of five men who served during World War II were honored. Their stories are part of a new book. It's called Unsung Heroes: Voices of World War II. The stories of ten men are covered in the book. All of the men live in the Charlotte area. The youngest is 91 years old. The oldest is 94. Author Bryan Boyett says he plans to release another volume in the near future.



------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Bryan Boyett is the author of two wonderful written biographical books about two young men from two totally different generations tied together by blood. In his first book, A New Beginning, you will follow Jonathan Joye on his difficult  but rewarding journey through Marine Corps Boot Camp in a contemporary setting. In Bryan's second book, Lieutenant Vincent 'Vinny' Malone, travel back in time to World War II and join a young pilot as he flies through the dangerous skies over North Africa and Italy. You will delight in the knowledge that these two men are grandfather and grandson, and that they are each in their own right a true testament to their respective generations.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Community Spotlight: Bryan Boyett
Posted by Josh Whitener on December 11, 2015 in News: Matthews-Mint Hill Weekly

Bryan Boyett is an inspirational speaker and author of three books that tell the true stories of past and present U.S. service members. Boyett, the son of a Korean War veteran, is actively involved in multiple area veteran’s initiatives and programs. Find more information at www.bryanboyett.webs.com.

 


What first piqued your interest in the military community?


After writing my first book, “A New Beginning, A Journey of Faith Through USMC Boot Camp,” about a friend’s journey through Marine Corps Boot Camp, I became interested in continuing to write about our veterans’ experiences as a way to give something back to the veteran community. That passion has led to my development as a military biographer.

 

Tell us a little about your experience as an author.


I have been interested in writing as far back as high school, and once I had completed that first book effort, I said to myself, “Wow, I’ve written a book, something I’ve always wanted to do. Now what?” I became inspired to begin writing again by reading declassified mission reports about my young Marine friend’s grandfather, who was an Army Air Corps fighter pilot in World War II. That led to my second book, “Lieutenant Vincent ‘Vinny’ Malone: The Man, The Machines and The Missions.” Soon after that project was completed, I began interviewing WWII veterans in the Charlotte area about their war experiences, and the result is my recently published book, “UNSUNG HEROES: Voices of World War Two.”

 

You’ve also been involved in re-enactments and other themed events in the area. What are some of the things you do on a regular basis?


I occasionally don WWII Army Air Corps apparel to honor Lt. Malone, the subject of my second book, mainly to visually attract the younger generations to what I am doing, that is to honor our WWII veterans by preserving their stories. I utilize book signings at various patriotic events as a fundraising activity, wherein I donate a portion of the sales to the particular organization that I am working with at the events.

 

What’s the most important thing you’ve learned from your work?


My writing has led to a deeper respect for all veterans and what they have done and are still doing to preserve our liberties. We cannot honor them enough.



Author photograph by Ben H. Badillo Digital Photography

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Local author encourages Charlotte Latin students to respect, honor veterans


Posted by Courtney Schultz on November 17, 2014

in Education Section - South Charlotte Weekly


Charlotte Latin School held an assembly to honor area veterans and to teach students about the importance of Veteran’s Day on Tuesday, Nov. 11.


“This is to recognize those among us who are or have served our country,” Headmaster Arch McIntosh Jr. said during the assembly.


The school recognized alumni, students, parents, grandparents, family and faculty who are veterans.


Bryan Boyett, an author, inspirational speaker and south Charlotte resident, served as the guest speaker to teach students about the history, traditions and meanings of Veteran’s Day. Boyett encouraged students and faculty to commemorate those who have served and to thank them for their service.


“We need to pay tribute to those who’ve protected liberty and freedom across generations,” Boyett said to the students. “When we honor our veterans we honor ourselves.”


The author never served in the armed forces, but feels he is doing his part by preserving soldiers’ sacrifices in his books, “A New Beginning: A Journey of Faith through USMC Boot Camp” and “Lieutenant Vincent ‘Vinny’ Malone: The Man, The Machines and The Missions.”


Boyett feels it is important to learn from our history. “If we learn from our mistakes, we learn for the future,” Boyett said, adding war should be a last resort, and society should use past mistakes to avoid what caused war in the future. “People need to understand we have to work together to make the world a better place,” he said.


Boyett hopes to promote honoring veterans, particularly those who served during the Vietnam War. Vietnam veterans are not honored the same as other veterans, and often were treated poorly because the Vietnam War was not viewed as a politically or culturally popular war, Boyett added. He encourages people to pay respect to those who have given their lives for the country.


Veterans from The Cypress Club, a retirement community, also spoke to students about their experiences in the war and answered their questions.


World War II and Korean War veteran Charles Carmichael completed over 100 missions for the U.S. Air Force during his time in the service. He said he enjoyed flying, which encouraged him to join the Air Force. He also discussed growing up in Charlotte, where he saw Civil War veterans, and how he felt connected to them and honored by their presence.


Korean War veteran George Duensing served in both the Atlantic and Pacific oceans during his time in the U.S. Navy. He said although he was not involved in fighting, he did have friends who did and he felt the impact of war through their experiences and losses. “War simply isn’t the way to solve a problem,” Duensing said to the students.


McIntosh said in Charlotte Latin’s mission statement, the school emphasizes civility and tries to help young people get along with others.


C.W. Stacks, a Charlotte Latin science teacher and coach, orchestrates the event every year and hopes it encourages students to look for ways to serve their community. He encourages students to look for careers in education and public health or to work for Americorp, Peace Corps or nonprofits.


“There are many needs in our country,” Stacks said. “Our students have the talent and attributes to make things better.”


Courtney Schultz/SCW photo


---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


A historical journey through prose
Posted by CarolinaWeekly  on May 8, 2014

Bryan Boyett didn’t originally intend to become an author. But his friend Jonathan Joye’s journey through United States Marine Corps recruit training led Boyett to publish his first book, “A New Beginning: A Journey of Faith through USMC Boot Camp,” several years ago.


Boyett’s inspiration was recently rekindled after hearing the story of Joye’s grandfather, Lt. Vincent Malone, who was a World War II fighter pilot. Malone’s story paved the way for Boyett’s second book, “Lieutenant Vincent ‘Vinny’ Malone: The Man, The Machines and The Missions,” which was officially released on April 16. “I’ve always been interested in writing but didn’t know where to go with it,” said Boyett, who won a small scholarship through an essay contest years ago. “This young man (Joye) did it for me, and when I saw (his grandfather’s) mission reports and started talking to the family, it inspired me again.”


The book is broken up into three parts. The first segment, “The Man,” is a mini-biography of Malone that concentrates on his early life and what led him to the war. The second, “The Machines,” is a documentary-like focus on the aircraft Malone flew during combat. The third and final segment, “The Missions,” consists of two parts – excerpts from Malone’s autobiographical war journal in his own words and a third-person retelling of his final 10 missions in chronological order, which makes up nearly one-half of the book.


The most challenging thing about writing the book, Boyett said, was writing about someone he’d never met. Because Malone had been dead for more than 30 years, Boyett had to draw from interviews with Malone’s family members, pages of his journal and documents about the aircraft and the missions.


Boyett also ended up rewriting the portion on the final 10 missions. He originally wrote the section as a first-person retelling from Malone’s perspective, but changed it to third person at the request of Malone’s family.


“That was challenging, rewriting from first person to third person,” Boyett said. Nevertheless, he wanted to respect the wishes of Malone’s family and ended up enjoying the challenge of putting the book together. “It was exciting, a lot of research … It was quite a labor of love, and I really enjoyed it.”


The book also includes an afterward with reflections from Malone’s children, as well as numerous photos from his life after the war. Boyett said his favorite things about writing the book included connecting with the people who knew Malone, researching and looking at the photos.


“I really get excited about working with a World War II historical retrospective,” Boyett said. “… Just finding all those great facts out, it gets my creative juices going.”


Boyett, who lives in Charlotte near Matthews, doesn’t have any immediate plans for another book, but he enjoys military history and serving as an inspirational speaker. Although he’s never been in the military, Boyett has two younger brothers who’ve had careers in the U.S. Air Force – something he said could possibly pave the way for a future book.


“There’ll be something to come out of the woodwork, just like this last book did,” Boyett said. “I’ll just keep my eyes and ears open.”


The book is available for purchase at Amazon.com. Find more information at www.bryanboyett.webs.com.


Author photograph by Ben H. Badillo Digital Photography

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------